Tag Archives: Friends/Repeat Offenders

Weekly Round-Up – Annie and the Fat Man

Gina FemiaIt’s the return of the weekly round-up and what a fabulous return it shall be.   Tuesday, October 6, Gina Femia brought us Annie and the Fat Man, a charming and engaging new play featuring a fabulous array of wonderful, layered characters.  Gina also packed in a amazing group of actors last night, Maki Borden, Stacey Raymond, Kyle Carter, and Erin Chung , keep your eyes peeled for anything remotely connected to these fabulous actors as there will be no regrets.

Things to know from Tuesday!

  1. We welcomed back a few LRR playwrights who had been inactive in previous cycles, Tim Errickson and Mila Golubov we missed your voices in the room, so glad to have you back! Reunited and it feels soo good. 
  2.  As a collective we feel that Kyle Carter would triumph in a one-man show where he portrays all three sisters in Chekhov‘s Three Sisters. (This will be news to Kyle)
  3. When our playwright powers combine it only takes us about two tries to notice a room has been redecorated.
  4. Gina Femia can write some killer stage directions, poetic even.
  5. No matter how small a balcony is, it’s still a balcony, and presumably outside, so we’ll take it okay, we’ll take it, even if it the only view is of the building right next door.

That’s about it, we came, we drank, we heard a great play, met some new actor types, and went off into the night dreaming of next Tuesday when Isaac Rathbone brings in a new play for us to digest.

Weekly Round Up-March 10

Playwright Jeremy Wine

Playwright Jeremy Wine

LRR lathered it up once again on March 10th with the latest installation of Jeremy Wine’s play PROXIMITY. An obsessive female scientist, a charmingly adorable sandwich delivery guy, the ghost (or is it?) of Nikola Tesla and the actual Richard Hoolbrooke find themselves in a deep-secret military lab in Dayton, Ohio in 1995 — all with the end game of stopping the nefarious Slobadan Milosevic. Is this a play or a way cool new Showtime series?

I learned many things while listening to Jeremy’s witty and wise words — delivered beautifully by repeat offenders Carson Lee and Jeremy Halpern (plus our own Amanda Keating):
  1. Gorgonzola isn’t just a kind of cheese. It’s also a video game. Apparently a cool one with a weird moral twist.
  2. Nikola Tesla was from Yugoslavia. And he would probably have a strong opinion about the Bosnian conflict of the mid-90s.
  3. Reclusive female scientists are indubitably more dramatically interesting than male scientists.
  4. Sandwich delivery guys can be remarkably charming. (At least when Jeremy writes them.)
  5. Roast beef and ham sandwiches are a thing. (At least in Jeremy’s play.)
  6. If you need to get rid of Gina, just talk about politics.
  7. Jen B can’t wait for watermelon and feta.
We all can’t wait to hear what happens next when Jeremy brings this back for our May play festival, Soap Gets In Your Eyes!
Thanks to Natalie Wilson for bringing us this fabulous Weekly Round-Up!
LRR is taking this week off but all will return to normal next Tuesday when newest member Matt Barbot steps up to the plate for the first time!
Hope everybody has a happy and safe St. Patrick’s Day!

The Monthly Wash Issue 1

Lather Rinse Repeat Logo

Lather, Rinse, Repeat playwrights are some of the busiest people in this schtinkin’ town full of schtinkin’ busy people.  Aside from all the happenings they host together there’s a slew of happenings of their own design happening seemingly ALL. THE. TIME.  We thought rather than keeping all of these delightful events to ourselves we might share them with you, the world, via THE MONTHLY WASH.  Let us help YOU stay abreast to everything Lather, Rinse, Repeat and keep you as busy as the LRR gang throughout the month!

FROM GINA FEMIA | SUPER, OR, HOW CLARK GRAVES LEARNED TO FLY

So, first on the list is a very exciting FREE reading from our newest member Gina Femia.  She’s got a new play in the works, Super, or, How Clark Graves Learned to Fly  and we think it sounds well…super.

Super, or, How Clark Graves Learned to Fly is about the shrinking of the middle class as seen through the eyes of a typical American Family – The Graves. Father Samuel has lost his once  thriving construction business, forcing the family to downsize significantly. Each member is coping with their personal loss of power differently; Mother Mary is addicted to scratch-off lotto tickets, sister Dot cannot stop picking her skin, Father Samuel has gotten mean and Clark – well, Clark is trying to be everyone’s hero, including his new girlfriend, Laney. When Laney’s dreams of running away begin to seem like they’ll become a reality, Clark must choose between his family and his chance at happiness. Intercut with scenes from Clark’s comic book world, Super, or, How Clark Graves Learned to Fly explores the increasing hunger crisis as it spreads across America, asking the questions How do we learn to Fly? and What does it really mean to be Super?

Sunday, February 8, 7pm | Drama Bookshop, 240 W. 40th Street


Photo credit: Mitch Dean

Photo credit: Mitch Dean

FROM JEN BROWNE | THE ORPHEUS VARIATIONS W/ THE DECONSTRUCTIVE THEATRE PROJECT                                                                                                                                 

Fun fact, on top of being a LRR playwright, Jen Browne is an ensemble member with The Deconstructive Theatre project and this week they opened the first of ten encore performances of their show The Orpheus Variations.  Inspired by the Orpheus myth and the neuroscience of memory, The Deconstructive Theatre Project’s critically and audience acclaimed performance collides cinema, radio play, and theatre vocabularies into an art-house film created and screened in real time.

Straight from their sold out run at The Public Theater’s Under the Radar Festival you have until February 14th to check out what Time Out NY calls a, a multimedia fantasia. 

Check out the trailer and purchase special $20 tickets HERE.

 February 4-February 14| Theatre at the 14th Street Y located at 344 East 14th Street


FROM MARIAH MACCARTHY AND ISAAC RATHBONE |NEW YORK CITY INDIE THEATRE ONE-MINUTE PLAY FESTIVAL                                                                                               

The One-Minute Play Festival and the New Ohio Theatre have created a dynamic partnership for The 1st New York City Indie Theatre One-minute Play Festival – with part of the proceeds to benefit Indie Theatre Now and the New Ohio’s new play and artist residency programming.

The festival consists of one-minute plays by nearly 50 established and emerging playwrights who identify as part of the downtown or indie theatre community, prompted by #1MPF’s unique playmaking process and LRR is totally representing with plays by Mariah MacCarthy and Isaac Rathbone.  You can also see work from some of our favorite LRR Friends, Diana Oh, Kevin R. Free and Leta Tremblay.

Get your tickets HERE

 February 17, 18, and 19, 8pm | The New Ohio Theater


 

AND speaking of LRR Friends how about you check out the work of some of our REPEAT OFFENDERS, the actors and directors we work with and love the most.

FROM HEATHER LEE ROGERS | THE CHURCH OF WHY NOT w/ THEATRE 167                                                                                                                                                                               

Inspired by the very place in which it’s performed, The Church of Why Not brings together believers and skeptics, activists and addicts, seekers and lost souls.  Some need food, some crave connection others come for help with taxes, tutoring or a Bar Mitzvah.  Conceived and directed by Ari Laura Kreith; collaboratively written by Camillo Andres Almonacid, Jenny Lyn Bader and J. Stephen Brantley featuring a diverse ensemble of 18 actors and some music.

Tickets are just $18 and can be purchased HERE

February 20-March 15 | West End Theater, Church of St Paul & St Andrew, 263 West 86th , 2nd fl 


 

We hope to see you out there and tune in next month for more from the Lather, Rinse, Repeat gang in THE MONTHLY WASH!

#Selfie First Flight w/ Tim Errickson and Boomerang Theatre Company

Good news world,  got to chat with Tim Errickson about First Flight, Boomerang Theatre Company’s annual festival of new plays.  It’s this week so read up and then get out there and check out some AMAZING PLAYS!!

 

Jen Browne: So something that is super great about Lather Rinse Repeat  is that a lot of playwrights in the group are so much more than playwrights, they’re very often writing, producing, directing, everything and you my friend might be king of the all-arounds working with Boomerang Theatre Company.  Can you tell me a little about where this all began for you and maybe how you’ve seen the company grow over the years?

Tim Errickson: Hardly the king, if you look around our little group. It began for me about 20 years ago when I began my first theatre company after college. I love making theatre, I love the audiences and the work. And I love validating work and encouraging playwrights by producing new plays. For the last 16 years, Boomerang Theatre Company has been my passion project. We’ve produced 55 plays and over 60 new play development readings and workshops. We began like all do, poor and not knowing how to do this work. But we learned and grew and gathered like-minded people.

 

JB: Boomerang breaks its season into three sections or so your website tells me, the third being First Flight, a reading series for new work.  Can you speak to the company’s relationship to new plays and playwrights?

TE: It’s funny, as I think it’s changing. Originally, we did all classics, and then began programming new plays to run along with classics in tandem. As we’ve gotten more established (and maybe as I’ve gotten older too), I love new plays more and more. I think that mystery of producing the new play, the unknown audience response, the unforeseen change in rehearsal, is just so exciting. I really love getting new plays off the page, out of readings and in front of people. And the writer is a huge component of that, because really we are supporting their idea of story and theme. We want them there as much as they can be, and we want them to feel like they have a place to bring work and make it better.

 

JB: Can you break down the details for this year’s festival?

TE: The 2014 First Flight New Play Festival consists of public readings of six new plays in various states of development. We kick off on Wednesday Nov 19th at 7pm and go through Monday Nov 24th at 7pm. All of our readings are at ART/NY, 520 Eighth Avenue, 3rd floor. Readings are always free, but if you’ve got $5 burning a hole in your pocket, we’ll take it and put it to good use.

 

JB: Producing new work can be risky business why is the risk worth it for you?

TE: Yeah, it’s a funny thing…what’s the risk? If you believe in the work, and it expresses your heart and mind, something important and passionate, it’s always going to work on some level. And it can be done expensively or cheaply depending on what you’ve got to work with. So I’m all in. More New Plays!

 

JB: How has producing new work influenced the development of your company and your place in the New York theater landscape?

TE: I think on some level we put our own stamp on things. I hope that people see a play and recognize that it’s a Boomerang play, that it has substance, intelligence, daring use of language, and fearlessness. We apply that to all our projects, but I think it is more obvious in the new plays we choose to develop.

 

JB: Any other tidbits we should know about this year’s Fest or future Boomerang programs?

TE: We just keep trying to grow the festival all the time. Constantly improving it to make it more helpful to the writers, so that their needs are served. We’re excited about this year’s lineup, and hope you’ll come check them out.

This year’s First Flight Festival includes work by Vincent Sessa, Johnna Adams, Michael Aguirre, Adam Kraar, Tim Errickson, Shelley McPherson.   Dates and times for all readings can be found HERE!

Guest Star Selfie #3

On March 4th, Lather, Rinse, Repeat had the ultimate luck to snag the delightful and talented Kevin R. Free to join the feedback fray for LRR playwright Jeremy Wine’s new play.   Despite being knee deep in a production of a new concert version of The Music Man, Kevin took the time to answer a few questions from Jen Browne.

1. Jen Browne: Last week you spoke briefly about working with the New York Neo-Futurists and on your website you credit them as “the people who helped me find my voice.”  Can you talk a bit about your time with them and how it’s shaped you as a theater maker?

Kevin R. Free: Being a Neo-Futurist was the most amazing challenge! It’s a grind – from writing all the plays, learning the plays, running the whole organization administratively, and navigating being in an ensemble in which we are all artistic directors. It made me a better theatre-maker. I make my own sound cues now; I know more about how to make or procure my own props; I am generally much better at making a way out of no way when there isn’t budget to do all the things I want. As the only writer of color in the company for a while, I had race and identity on my mind a lot, and I learned how to write about it. Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind  is still the item on my resume that gets the most comments when I audition. I am so grateful to have done the show.

2. JB: Trolling through your website I also found an amazing list of books that you recorded as audio books.   Are there types of books that are more fun to record?  Is there a book out there new or old that you would love to add your vocal talents to?  Do you listen to audio books or are you more of a book in hand type of guy? (If it’s against the law to say you prefer to read a book over listening to it if you record them, don’t answer!)

KF: Thanks for trolling my website! I really love my job, though sometimes it is harder than I expect it to be. I love a good story, so it’s hard to say which kinds of stories are my favorites. I can say that my favorite book I’ve ever recorded was a book called The Mushroom Hunters. It’s a non-fiction book about people who forage for mushrooms. There are restaurants in Seattle mentioned in the book that I cannot wait to visit. There’s an author named Mat Johnson whose books I LOVE, and I want to be his narrator. Really bad. Mat, hit me up. I generally don’t listen to audiobooks, but that’s only because I have a short attention span. My mind wanders easily…

3. JB: You also mentioned your work as the producing artistic director  for The Fire This Time Festival can you speak more about the festival, where you’ve been and where you’re going?

 KF: The Festival provides a platform for early career playwrights of African and African-American descent for two years. The first year, we produce 10-minute world premiere plays of the playwrights we’ve chosen; the second year, we produce readings of full-length plays written by those playwrights. I was a playwright in Season 3 and 4, and I became the Producing Artistic Director of the Festival in Season 4. At the end of March, we are taking 6 plays to Boston to Hibernian Hall, and we hired a company of four kick-ass actors (Chris Michael Burke, Tracey Conyer Lee, Sara Thigpen, and Chinaza Uche) to play the roles, all directed by Nicole A. Watson! I really love the work we do, and I love cultivating and working with this community of artists, and I am excited about the way the festival is growing!

4. JB: You are an actor, writer, director, and a producer.  What challenges, if any do you find wearing all of these hats?  Do you think your work in any of these roles is mirrored or reflected in any of the others?  Is producer Kevin different from actor Kevin who is different from writer Kevin?

KF: I think Writer Kevin reflects actor Kevin pretty well. I like to make broad choices as an actor until I am reined in by a director, and my plays tend to be a little larger than life. Producer Kevin is much more tired than any of the other Kevins, and doesn’t like the fighting involved with Producing.

5. JB: You seem to be a snappy dresser and I appreciate your use of the bowtie.  Do you have a go-to bowtie shop?  When it comes to personal style, is there a word that best describes you?

KF: YES. Thank you! I love shopping at Beau Ties Limited. beautiesltd.com. They are the best!

Kevin R. Free

After a great run at Two River Theater Company in Red Bank, NJ, The Music Man, featuring an all-African-American cast can also be seen this weekend at NJPAC.   Get your tickets here: http://www.njpac.org/events/detail/the-music-man.  And for more from Kevin R. Free visit his website kevinrfree.com.