Category Archives: Weekly Roundups

Weekly Round-Up – Annie and the Fat Man

Gina FemiaIt’s the return of the weekly round-up and what a fabulous return it shall be.   Tuesday, October 6, Gina Femia brought us Annie and the Fat Man, a charming and engaging new play featuring a fabulous array of wonderful, layered characters.  Gina also packed in a amazing group of actors last night, Maki Borden, Stacey Raymond, Kyle Carter, and Erin Chung , keep your eyes peeled for anything remotely connected to these fabulous actors as there will be no regrets.

Things to know from Tuesday!

  1. We welcomed back a few LRR playwrights who had been inactive in previous cycles, Tim Errickson and Mila Golubov we missed your voices in the room, so glad to have you back! Reunited and it feels soo good. 
  2.  As a collective we feel that Kyle Carter would triumph in a one-man show where he portrays all three sisters in Chekhov‘s Three Sisters. (This will be news to Kyle)
  3. When our playwright powers combine it only takes us about two tries to notice a room has been redecorated.
  4. Gina Femia can write some killer stage directions, poetic even.
  5. No matter how small a balcony is, it’s still a balcony, and presumably outside, so we’ll take it okay, we’ll take it, even if it the only view is of the building right next door.

That’s about it, we came, we drank, we heard a great play, met some new actor types, and went off into the night dreaming of next Tuesday when Isaac Rathbone brings in a new play for us to digest.

TRIPLE CROWN ROUND-UP ROYALE

TRIPLE CROWN ROUND-UP ROYALE

Welcome to the first ever TRIPLE CROWN ROUND-UP ROYALE, that’s three round-ups, representing three new plays and their respective playwrights, PLUS the playwrights in the field that brought us all the tantalizing tidbits.  There you go, a TRIPLE CROWN ROUND-UP ROYALE.

April 7

ALMOST FREE by Tim Duncheon with reporting by Isaac Rathbone

George W.

George W.

Tim Duncheon brought us new pages from his play Almost Free which will be presented IN FULL on May 20th to close out the Soap Gets In Your Eyes reading play festival. Admission to these readings aren’t “almost free,” they’re COMPLETELY FREE! Anyway, Tim’s play is a hilarious farce about colonial medicine, American history and slavery.  It’s an edgy look at how much American race relations really haven’t changed in over 200 years. We all secretly wished that Tim was our “cool” college history professor. Maybe next cycle, he can start wearing corduroy blazers with elbow patches and say things like, “Don’t call me Professor Duncheon. You can call me Tim.”

Some highlights of the night included:

  1. Tim D cannot tell a lie: George Washington owned slaves. Think about that the next time you throw down a dollar bill at a restaurant or strip club.
  2. The play is set in Philadelphia during a yellow fever epidemic in 1793. Treatments included bloodlettings and eating bark. Pssh. Thanks, Obamacare.
  3. Like Tim’s other plays, Almost Free featured a “man of mystery.” #wherearethewomen?
  4. Ike ordered a BLT from Mikey’s and again they made a mistake and he received a burger instead. Thanks, Obamacare.
  5. We had no feedback discussions regarding real estate. Nothing. The evening felt incomplete.
  6. One of the characters signed the Declaration of Independence. What have your character’s done lately?

April 14

POSTED by Brandon Marianne Lee with reporting by Matt Barbot

Emily Post

Emily Post

Whee!

This go-round we had the beginnings of a brand new play by our resident fantasy football fanatic femme fatale (that’s alliteration, for you English majors) Brandon Marianne Lee!

Posted is Brandon’s new play about the doldrums of the hyper-masculine corporate banking world, with all the fat jokes and casual sexism that it entails. Who better to shake things up than early twentieth century author and expert in etiquette Emily Post? (No one better, is the answer, in case you were wondering.

THINGS WE LEARNED

  1. In Brandon’s play, the company’s Lactation Room serves as a male-free refuge for the women to congregate and plot. In reality, they’re usually pretty bland and poorly decorated. We lamented that something as cool and important as a room devoted entirely to lactation could be treated as an afterthought. For shame!
  2. Brandon’s character Octavia is based on an actual living person named Octavia with whom Brandon works. Don’t worry, though! Octavia knows she’s being transmogrified into a fictional character, and will probably be at the reading! Come on out to meet the fake Octavia and the real Octavia and see if you can tell which is which!
  3. We had a minor disagreement about whether Brandon’s character Catherine had been possessed by the spirit of Emily Post, was pretending, or had experienced an emotional break. There were only minor injuries.

Come to the reading of Posted on Sunday, May 17th, at 1:00PM, but remember your manners and be on your best behavior.

April 21

HAGS, MOPES, AND THE END OF ALL EXISTENCE by Jen Browne with reporting by Amanda Keating

Chickens in a bathtub.

Chickens in a bathtub.

Last week, Jen Browne brought us the beautiful, strange story of Mopes and Hags, two folks long past their prime who, as they await the imminent destruction of the world and their accompanying demise, find an unexpected gift of biblical proportions on their doorstep. Mopes and Hags unknowingly contemplate the great questions of existence, all while gazing into the eyes of their former selves and keeping their family of chickens (yes, chickens) out of weather-related-harm’s way.

Things we learned?

  1. In the event of an earthquake, make sure the chickens are in the bathtub. …or is it a tornado?
  2. Some humans are sexually attracted to comets.
  3. What’s so bad about a hiccup: “They never amount to anything they just disappear and then everybody’s glad they’re gone.”

Like what you hear? Well you can hear it all if you come to the reading of Hags, Mopes, and the End of All Existence at 1:30PM on May 10. Just come! This play is beautiful and also very funny.

April 28….

Wow, wow, wow, let’s not get ahead of ourselves…Tonight we hear Natalie Wilson’s festival offering The Innkeeper and then that’s right it’s ALMOST FESTIVAL TIME!

SOAP GETS IN YOUR EYES: a festival of new plays runs May 10 through May 20 at Shetler Studios.  The full schedule and details can be found HERE.

Soap Gets In Your Eyes

See you there!!

MEGA ROUND UP – Matt Barbot and Amanda Keating Bring Down the #NewPlay House

Hello,

This time Jen Browne gets a break, and instead you are left with the insanity of one Brandon Marianne Lee. In case you are new here and confused by that name, I am a woman with cute parents.

On to the plays!

Warriors of Adalandia by Matt Barbot

For the first time Matt Barbot brought in work to the Lather Rinse Repeat family, and we fell in love with his new play. The story depicts a brother and sister dealing with normal teenage stuff, like video games and baseball. But then you find out that their father is catatonic and his sister is actually a fairy princess, and all hell breaks loose. This play is unbelievably charming and yet asks some tough questions about growing up, identity and has some rather dark undertones that creates a rich tone that hooks your heart. Well done, rookie!

What we learned: IMG_5858

1. Our other new member, Gina Femia, is a female gamer like the heroine of Matt’s story. Her passion was palpable and was really fun to see and hear. And even though Gina was by far and away the most knowledgable with regards to the gamer culture, every single person who heard Matt’s play was in-the-know and absolutely understood how important this game was to each of the characters.

2. The old Yankees stadium was the better stadium. Matt had a line about it in his play and absolutely everyone agreed. #facts

3. Many of the members of the group had conspiracy theories as to who was in the “game” and “real-life” and if there was any overlap. We’re all on the edge of our seat wondering if any of our predictions come true with Matt presents his piece in our first full-length play festival, Soap Gets in Your Eyes. Check it out!

“Not Yet Titled” by Amanda Keating

Last week Amanda brought us a tapestry of complex characters beautifully woven together by the closing of a school in a community that seems to be falling apart.  Amanda still hasn’t decided on the name, but she certainly nailed each character’s specific voice and need right out of the gates. In the face of loss, each character tries to evaluate what they really want in life and if the town of Wyman is the perfect or worst place for each of them to find some sort of happiness.

What we learned: IMG_5866

1. Don’t waste your time with instant coffee. Life is too short and it is time wasted. Literally, this was a wonderful point made by one of Amanda’s characters and it rang true in many, many ways.

2. “You had me at Sky & Telescope.” Tim Duncheon gave this little bit of feedback and made the whole room roar with laughter. I guess Tim used to be very into Astronomy as a kid (I almost typed Astrology, whoops), and had a subscription to the RIVAL Astronomy magazine. Yes, for all of you that are interested, you can have your pick of the magazines about the sky. Love it.

3. Much of this play had coffee drinking and/or mentions of meals. Consumption can be a flippant word when referring to consumerism or waste, but there is an act of taking something in that is entirely enveloped with love. For instance, the act of eating squid stew with a character’s mother kept coming up and it meant something to each and every character on the stage and to all of us listening to the work. Sometime what fills our bellies fills our hearts.

That’s all for now, but please check back later this week for another roundup and the announcement of our new festival! Be well!

Weekly Round Up-March 10

Playwright Jeremy Wine

Playwright Jeremy Wine

LRR lathered it up once again on March 10th with the latest installation of Jeremy Wine’s play PROXIMITY. An obsessive female scientist, a charmingly adorable sandwich delivery guy, the ghost (or is it?) of Nikola Tesla and the actual Richard Hoolbrooke find themselves in a deep-secret military lab in Dayton, Ohio in 1995 — all with the end game of stopping the nefarious Slobadan Milosevic. Is this a play or a way cool new Showtime series?

I learned many things while listening to Jeremy’s witty and wise words — delivered beautifully by repeat offenders Carson Lee and Jeremy Halpern (plus our own Amanda Keating):
  1. Gorgonzola isn’t just a kind of cheese. It’s also a video game. Apparently a cool one with a weird moral twist.
  2. Nikola Tesla was from Yugoslavia. And he would probably have a strong opinion about the Bosnian conflict of the mid-90s.
  3. Reclusive female scientists are indubitably more dramatically interesting than male scientists.
  4. Sandwich delivery guys can be remarkably charming. (At least when Jeremy writes them.)
  5. Roast beef and ham sandwiches are a thing. (At least in Jeremy’s play.)
  6. If you need to get rid of Gina, just talk about politics.
  7. Jen B can’t wait for watermelon and feta.
We all can’t wait to hear what happens next when Jeremy brings this back for our May play festival, Soap Gets In Your Eyes!
Thanks to Natalie Wilson for bringing us this fabulous Weekly Round-Up!
LRR is taking this week off but all will return to normal next Tuesday when newest member Matt Barbot steps up to the plate for the first time!
Hope everybody has a happy and safe St. Patrick’s Day!

Mega Weekly Roundup: Vol. 1 and 2

For the first week of our new cycle, we heard Raindrop and Sundrop, a new play by Gina Femia, one of our new members! Composed by Gina in one whirlwind week, Raindrop and Sundrop tells the story of two estranged sisters reunited in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. The incendiary situation leads to some dark revelations about their family and their past relationships.

Impressively, Gina’s play also takes place on one set and transpires in real time! If he had been alive and able to join us for her reading, Aristotle would have been proud.

What about the second week, you ask?

Great question.

On the most recent Tuesday, we heard a new draft of Isaac Rathbone’s play Chub, a comedy-drama about parenthood, puppets, and the Great Recession. If you’ve ever wanted to steal a rental car and track down an eBay seller because the stench of one of the used puppets you bought has exacerbated marital tensions, then maybe this play is based on your life.

Here’s a list of things we learned over these two wweeks:

1) Abusive relationships make for bad vacations.

Conventional wisdom would suggest that vacations are always fun, but Gina showed us that, under some circumstances, they are not.

2) One should do one’s best to attend one’s father’s funeral, even if it’s in another borough.

The fact that it’s in Queens and there are weekend service changes is NO EXCUSE.

3) All of Gina’s other plays have unicorns in them.

Gina’s other plays feature magical realism. All magical realism has to do with unicorns. Therefore, it follows that all of Gina’s other plays have unicorns in them.

4) Amanda may not be able to make Jeremy’s funeral.

She’s got plans.

5) The playwrights of LRR know a surprising amount about real estate.

So says Matt Barbot. As a new member of LRR, he has obviously not made it through the Lather Rinse Repeat Playwrights’ Guide to REIT Investing. All proceeds go to our reading series.

6) When your marriage is in trouble, consider the bowling alley in Syosset.

Maybe it’ll get your marriage back on track, but even if it doesn’t, at least you’ll get to bowl.

7) Chub the puppet is not actually named Chub!!

We won’t tell you what he’s actually named, because that would be a spoiler.

8) Puppets are great.

This is self-evident.

 

Gina and the actors of Raindrops!

Gina and the actors of Raindrops!

 

 

Jeremy and Ike ponder Chub.

Jeremy and Ike ponder Chub.