Category Archives: Short Forms

Monthly Wash Issue V

BEHOLD! It’s Issue V of the Monthly Wash.  It’s been awhile we know but it certainly has been worth the wait! We’ve got some super #newplays on the horizon many of which will be presented in dark air conditioned theaters so get your tickets and get your chill on with some icy cool theatre.

FROM GINA FEMIA | THE VIOLET SISTERS and SUPER, OR, HOW CLARK GRAVES LEARNED TO FLY

Image credit: Freddy Padilla

Image credit: Freddy Padilla

Watch as Gina Femia doubles down on this month’s wash.  She’s got two plays on the starting block all just within a few days of each other!

Part of New York Madness’ Inaugural MadLab, first up, The Violet Sisters.  Following Pam who comes home to attend her father’s funeral in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, only to be greeted by an angry sister, a dilapidated house and a past she can’t escape.

If you missed this awesome play at LRR’s full length festival Soap Gets in Your Eyes, here’s your chance for redemption.  The MadLab production is directed by Michele Travis and stars Romy Nordlinger and Stacey Raymond.

Rolling out next is March Forth Productions presentation of Super, or, How Clark Graves Learned to Fly.  The play examines the shrinking of the middle class as seen through the eyes of a typical American Family –The Graves. Intercut with scenes from Clark’s comic book world, this play explores the increasing hunger crisis as it spreads across America, asking the questions How do we learn to Fly?  And what does it really mean to be Super?the increasing hunger crisis as it spreads across America, asking the questions How do we learn to Fly? and What does it really mean to be Super?Dot cannot stop picking her skin, Father Samuel has gotten mean and Clark –well, Clark is trying to be everyone’s hero, including his new girlfriend, Laney.

Both of these events are FREE! FREE! FREE! Details for both are below!

The Violet Sisters | Thursday, July 2 at 8:00 pm | IRT Theater (154 Christopher Street) | RESERVE HERE

Super, or, How Clark Graves Learned to Fly | July 6th at 7:30 pm | Under St. Mark’s (94 St. Mark’s Place) |No reservation needed just show up!


FROM NATALIE WILSON | IN TRANSIT

Montréal Skyline

Happy Canada Day! From July 29th – August 2nd Natalie Wilson’s short play IN TRANSIT — originally developed for LRR’s short forms series “Now Boarding J/K! #fml #delayed” — will be featured in the New Play Development Showcase of New Plays in Montreal, Canada this summer! The workshop is part of the annual ATHE (Association for Theater In Higher Education) conference. Natalie will be working with an esteemed international team of collaborators, including director Andrea Grapko, dramaturg Julia Listengarten, scenographer Tali Ariav, and actors Leah Roy and Cindy Gendrich.

You can’t get tickets to this one folks but you can wish Natalie luck on her journey north of the border!


OTHER THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW

There’s only a few more days left for f*ckfest at The Brick curated by our own Mariah MacCarthy | Tim Erickson has two shows running The Firebird at Planet Connections Theatre Festivity and Cymbeline | Satelite member Lauren Ferebee is doing some Scrappy Shakespeare down in Spartanburg, SC | Matt Barbot’s play BOLDLY GO is part of The Navigators Theater Company’s Lift-Off Series

That’s it for now, more to come in August, there’s always more to come!

lather rinse repeat_logo_timd

Monthly Wash Issue IV

We’re just a week or so out from our first ever full-length festival Soap Gets in Your Eyes and yet LRR playwrights still find time to do OTHER projects.  It’s crazy we know!


FROM TIM ERRICKSON | LICKSPITTLES, BUTTONHOLERS AND DAMNED PERNICIOUS GO-BETWEENS 

Illustration by Stefano Imbert

Illustration by Stefano Imbert

 

Mr. Errickson is not only an LRR playwright but he’s ALSO the Artistic Director of Boomerang Theatre Company and they’ve got a killer show in Lickspittles, Buttonholers and Damned Pernicious Go-Betweens.  We’ve got the details and a sød (sweet!) discount below, hope to see you there!

Three extraneous Danish court officials: a professional loud mouth (the buttonholer), a kiss ass for hire (the lickspittle) and a successful dastard (the go-between) are tossed out of court just as Denmark’s merchant fleet becomes of strategic importance in the Napoleonic war. The three men journey to France and meet Napoleon’s top lickspittle, buttonholer and go-between, their female counterparts. Plots abound, flying machines are destroyed and the head of Marie Antoinette is discovered during the madcap struggle to save Copenhagen from British howitzers. The main characters speak in rhyming Alexandrine verse, while a host of supporting characters converse in sestinas, haiku, free verse, limericks and sonnets. In a rhyming, metered world, the offbeat rules.

Stay up to date on show news and check out some HIGHLY enjoyable production shots on Boomerang’s blog: Boomerangtheatre.wordpress.com

Tickets are $25 but Lather Rinse Repeat readers save $10 when using code Boom2015 to purchase tickets. Get yours NOW!

 May 1st-May 17th, 2015 | Teatro Circulo, 64 E 4th Street, New York, NY 10003

Follow Boomerang Theatre Company on Twitter! @boomerangtheatr


FROM ISAAC RATHBONE | DEB & JOAN AT PULP GULP w/ PULP STAGE

Pulp Gulp Pulp Stage

Ike first presented Deb & Joan at LRR’s second night of short works, Mistakes Were Made, and we’re really pleased to see it out and about, in fact it’s pretty far from home, all the way in Portland, Oregon with Pulp Stage and their series Pulp Gulp.

Pulp Gulp: Actors. Dialogue. Forbidden love amongst aliens, robots…and nerds.

60 minutes of riveting science fiction and fantasy storytelling through dialogue. Featuring “Deb & Joan” about an android who falls in love with her research scientist.

To see the full line-up visit Stage Pulp’s website by clicking right….HERE.

You can also give them a follow at any of these local social media sites, Facebook: ThePulpStage Twitter: @ThePulpStage.

Seating starts at 7:30pm and their’s a suggested donation of $5-$10 but we know Ike’s show is worth at least $10, so if you go, go with a tenner.

May 8th, 8pm | Sip D’vine 7829 SW Capitol Hwy, Portland, OR 97219


FROM MARIAH MACCARTHY| UNTIL SHE CLAWS HER WAY OUT

Marathon Lockup blu gry-04 (1)It’s marathon season, at least at Ensemble Studio Theatre.  Word on the street is that this year, EST received a whopping 1,078 submissions for the 35th Marathon of One-Act Plays and somehow narrowed it down to 14 plays.  One of those plays is Until She Claws Her Way Out by our own Mariah MacCarthy.  Until She Claws Her Way Out is directed and choreographed by Sidney Erik Wright and will run in Series A.

The marathon begins on May 13th and runs, (get it, runs) until June 27.
The full line-up for Series A, B and C as well as specific performance dates and times, ticket prices, the whole shebang really, can be found at the usual spot and by that we mean the EST WEBSITE!

FROM LATHER RINSE REPEAT | SOAP GETS IN YOUR EYES

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Join Lather Rinse Repeat: A Playwrights Collective for their inaugural festival of new works.   Featuring readings of 11 new plays!   We have alot, ALOT,  in the great plays and performances for you from May 10-May 20.  All of the details are below.  Make sure to reserve your seats ASAP as seating for every reading is LIMITED!  Reservations can be made HERE
KICK-OFF TOAST
Join us Sunday, May 10, at 1pm for a celebratory toast as we dive into our first ever full length festival!  Reservations for any of the scheduled shows earns you a Mimosa!

FULL PLAY DETAILS

Hags, Mopes, and the End of All Existence
Written by Jen Browne
Directed by Tasha Gordon-Solmon
Sunday, May 10, 130pm

Hags and Mopes have been married for as long as they can remember and they’ve had just about enough of each other so maybe it’s not such a bad thing there’s a comet making its way straight towards them, the blizzard of the century isn’t letting up, or that the cow and the goats have moved to Florida because the end is near.

Princess Clara of Loisaida
Written by Matt Barbot
Directed by Melissa Crespo
Sunday, May 10, 4pm

With Mamá gone and Papá out of commission, José is in charge of his video-game obsessed little sister Clara. When José finds out the fairy tales he’s been telling his little sister, Clara, might be true – that she’s not really his sister, that her parents found her by the fairy-castle in Central Park with a note pinned to her blanket – he is forced to fight a magical battle for her destiny.

Honors Students; or, The Avenging of Kruppcake
Written by Mariah MacCarthy
Directed by Christina Roussos
Sunday, May 10, 7pm

Kora and Minnie are best friends. And honors students. And are plotting something involving a lot of money and a little blood. When their volatile relationship is threatened by Minnie’s friendship with awkward YouTube sensation Megan, all bets are off. In the tradition of Heathers and The Virgin Suicides, Honors Students asks one question: Who will survive?

Go That Way
Written by Amanda Keating
Directed by Molly Clifford
Monday, May 11, 730pm

In the wake of their mother’s death, three estranged siblings take to the road with their best hometown pal in search of their even more estranged father. As they drive across America, eating McDonalds, sleeping in motels, and playing tunes on the boom box (the stereo is broken, of course), they sift through the shit that’s piled up between them over the years. When they get to where they’re going, it’s not what they expected, but hey. Maybe that’s a good thing.

Chub
Written by Isaac Rathbone
Directed by Linda S. Nelson
Tuesday, May 12, 730pm

Gary and Jill buy their two-year old a hand puppet for his birthday. At first, it’s the best present ever. But then the puppet develops an odor that threatens to destroy their marriage. A satirical look at the darker side of parenting.

Posted
Written by Brandon Marianne Lee
Directed by Sara Lyons
Sunday, May 17, 1pm

Waking up believing she is Emily Post, overnight Catherine goes from hot mess to corporate revolutionary. If manners are a form of respect, perhaps a delusion of grandeur could be a hammer that breaks a glass ceiling.

The Good Girl’s Guide to Climbing the Corporate Ladder: One Body at a Time
Written by Mila Golubov
Directed by Daniella Caggiano
Sunday, May 17, 4pm

An eager newbie joins an absurd advertising agency and quickly learns that to make it as a woman in a man’s world she needs to grow a pair. Except those times when she needs to show some leg. Except those other times when she plays the saint or the slut or the repentant sinner or the willing chump. After some not so subliminal advertising, awkward sex sessions and unnecessary bloodshed, will good girl go over to the dark side?

Proximity
Written by Jeremy Wine
Directed by Kel Haney
Sunday, May 17,7pm

Munderton, an underground inventor on the forefront of the early days of drone research, has been repeating unauthorized experiments out of Nikola Tesla’s confiscated notebooks.  Pressured by the leading diplomat negotiating peace in Yugoslavia, she is caught between helping end the war, repairing Tesla’s legacy, and Kevin, the sandwich delivery guy.

The Innkeeper
Written by Natalie Wilson
Directed by Josh Hecht
Monday, May 18, 730pm

A young woman expects to die; an old woman expects to live forever. A mystical inn has different ideas.

The Violet Sisters
Written by Gina Femia
Directed by Ivey Lowe
Tuesday, May 19, 730pm

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Pam comes home to attend her father’s funeral.  When she arrives, she is greeted by an angry sister, a dilapidated house and a past that she can’t escape.  The Violet Sisters is a play about forgiving when you cannot bring yourself to forget.

Almost Free
Written by Tim Duncheon
Directed by Kyle Metzger
Wednesday, May 20, 730pm

Philadelphia, 1793: In the middle of a deadly epidemic, a man named Nathaniel dreams of becoming a doctor. The problem? He’s a slave. Worse, his owners won’t free him until he unravels a major political conspiracy — a dangerous task requiring disguises, a trip to meet George Washington, and just a bit of treason. What wouldn’t you do to be free?

All readings take place at Shetler Studios 244 W. 54th Street, 12fl, New York, NY 10019.  You can find us in Shetler 1.

CLOSING PARTY!

Join us after the final performance to celebrate with the directors, the actors, and of course the playwrights!

We’ll obviously be celebrating after every reading so come meet up with us at Characters, our official festival sponsor, to chat about what you saw and buy all of us starving artists a well deserved beverage.

See there was zero exaggeration when we said May was gonna get busy.  We’re pretty excited about all of these delectable theater offerings and hope you’ll join us for one, two, or really ALL of them, we want you at all of them, if we’re being honest, you should mark them all in your calendar and be there, okay see you soon.

 

 

#selfies 2.9 ACTOR EDITION Isaiah Tanenbaum. (with questions by Jeremy W.)

Isaiah Tanenbaum

On the heels of our psychotically successful night of shorts, Mistakes Were Made: An Evening of Rom-Com and Political Shorts, Jeremy W. gathered mega-talent Isaiah Tanenbaum for a virtual coffee-side firechat.  And thus Selfies 2.9 was borne.

#selfie 2.0  is an interview series where Lather, Rinse, Repeat playwrights interview the actor ensemble for their next night of short plays.  Playwrights have free reign over the questions. The interviewee must then post an actual selfie, because we told them to.

Jeremy W.:  Cyberstalking you has given me the impression you have a solidly developed nerd side.  We’re seeing a embrace of nerdness in our culture; do you think the theatre will sufficiently nerd out?

Isaiah T.: Ack! You’ve discovered my shameful secret! Yes, I’m a huge nerd. I was the kid reading Star Trek books on the school bus, the kid who went to science camp to shoot off rockets, the kid who raced home from his job at the Renaissance Faire to make his weekly online Star Trek roleplaying IRC group (I was a pirate cabin boy and a Betazoid science officer, respectively).

I’m still that nerdy kid, really, so I question whether anything can “sufficiently” nerd out. Nerds are inherent collectors and puzzle-solvers – facts, comics, board games – so there is always an opportunity for more stuff to collect and more puzzles to solve, and that includes theatrical experiences.

I do think, though, that a lot of writers and directors confuse the ephemera of nerd culture – spaceships or robots or comic book action or scientist characters or whatever – for true nerdiness, and it’s totally possible to overdose on that kind of “surface” nerdiness. True nerdy theatre uses these trappings to give the audience a puzzle, an idea, something to chew on. That’s harder than just setting Three Sisters on Mars, but it’s a question of craft, and the end result is simply a Good Play, which there is always, ALWAYS room for. Plenty of playwrights are up to the challenge – Mac Rogers and August Schulenburg come to mind, of course – but I’ve seen more than a few make the “spaceships=nerdy play” mistake. You can do the same with a love story or a crime drama or any other subgenre of narrative, really; just sprinkling a few familiar conventions on top of dull characters and calling it a day. It’s just particularly obvious with “nerdy” plays because the conventions are so in-your-face; when that’s all your play has, it all falls apart pretty quickly.

Jeremy W.:  I’m only just getting to know your acting work, but from what I’ve seen in the readings, from role to role, you innately bring to each character that universal need to be an engaged part of proceedings.  It’s very compelling.  Is that Isaiah coming out or is it a part of your craft?

Isaiah T: That’s really kind of you to say. If there’s anything of Isaiah in there, it’s my kind-of overwhelming personal need to be loved at all times by everyone around me. It’s probably pretty annoying in person but on stage I guess it reads as compelling, so hooray! YOU LOVE ME MY JOB IS DONE.

But seriously, I think it’s back to that nerdy puzzle thing I was talking about before. Why is my character doing X? Solving for X is part of the fun of performing a role. I’ve found that the answer is almost always something like “because another character just did or said Y, for which X is the only response my guy could have in that moment, because he wants Z to happen.” Then of course the director wants something else so I get to decide that, in fact, Q is really the thing I ought to do. But it’s always in response to the other person on the stage, and in the hopes of creating a change in them. This automatically engages me because I’m necessarily aware of what they are doing, and adjusting my responses accordingly. I even do that for monologues; the “other person” is either the audience or some future version of my character, which is to say, me.

This is all probably familiar to other actors who have read Declan Donnellan’s frankly amazing The Actor and the Target. That book was a godsend for me, because I never connected with the emotional sense-memory stuff that my college professor loved. I totally recognize it’s catnip for plenty of amazingly talented actors, but for me, it’s all about objectives and goals and tactics and DOING things. That’s where I live. So The Actor and the Target, combined with Actions: The Actor’s Thesaurus (which is basically a cross-referenced and organized-by-category list of highly specific, active verbs for actors to attach to lines), has formed the core of what I do on stage.

And when all that doesn’t work I just make funny faces.

Jeremy W.:  What is your dream hairstyle?

Isaiah T.: Anything. Literally anything. I like to say that my hair has exactly two styles: short, and jewfro. Mine just grows straight out and I look like The Wolfman, so basically it’s been variations of the Ceasar Cut since high school, and will remain as such forever. I am insanely jealous of people who actually have hair they can do anything with. I would kill for something like David Tenant’s infinitely styleable hair. It can do fun hedgehog! It can do long and mopey! It can get pushed back into a mohawk if for some reason he wants that! It can do whatever he wants! DAMN YOU TENANT.

Jeremy W.:  For those of us who live under rocks, what is it about your company Flux Theatre Ensemble that keeps you guys trucking along?

Isaiah T: Flux is just amazing. I don’t know what my life as a performer would look like if I hadn’t stumbled in on that group of people in 2006 off of a Craigslist ad (no joke, a Craigslist ad). We’ve been around for eight years now, which in Indie Theatre Years is two eternities and a forever. I think that longevity comes down to three highly-interconnected factors:

1) A tight focus on central operating principles we chose for ourselves that we call our Core Values (Joy, Compassion, Collaboration, Creativity, Excellence). We try to hold ourselves to these values in all things we touch, both in our artistic choices and in our producing choices. After everything we do, from full productions to casting calls to e-blasts, we ask ourselves “now, that thing we did, was it Compassionate? If not, how could it be more so?” And so on, down the list. It’s pretty easy to get lost in the day-to-day of making theatre, and even easier to make expedient choices, but having those five touchpoints to come back to keeps you focused and honest, and in the end a process that is more Joyful/Creative/etc is simply going to be more inspiring, rewarding, and enduring.

2) Our incredible community of fellow artists, collaborators, and audience members (many of whom, including more than a few Rinsers, are officially-designated Friends of Flux). Whether serving as box office volunteers, or running a fundraising committee, or offering props and costumes and expertise and shop-space, or just showing up again and again, the community that has grown up around us has helped us punch well above our weight for years. At this point, most of my personal friends are also Friends of Flux (or just lower-case-f friends of Flux), because that’s how close-knit this community is. When you develop that kind of long-term partnership, you don’t ever want to let anyone down.

3) We do a lot of stuff. Like, a lot. This semester, in fact (yes, I still think of my life in semesters), we’ve had or are having a major Flux event every month: The Annual Retreat, Have Another (our readings-in-a-bar series), a SpeakEasy (a kind of townhall for FoFs), next week’s Food:Soul (more staged readings, but with food), the upcoming Family Feud Benefit Party (please come!), and then another Have Another in December. And of course Flux Sundays nearly every week, which is like actor/playwright gym and just loads of fun. It’s kind of impossible not to keep going when there are so many things happening; there’s simply no chance to let the momentum falter.

And these are all related: our Core Values have attracted that community and kept it tight; the community, in turn, helps us run all these events; the events reward the community by giving them chances to perform and enjoy theatre; when we hew to our values they and we are doubly-rewarded, and we’re all moved to create more stuff to share. It’s like a triple-positive feedback loop and it’s kind of stupidly inspiring to be at the center of it.

Jeremy W.:  You seem terribly at home in the theatre in almost every way.  Are you as comfortable doing this work as you appear to be?

Isaiah T.: You are like the sweetest interviewer ever.

On the one hand, yes, I’ve always liked it when people listen to me, and it turns out there’s a whole career where actual adults pay real, actual money to buy a ticket where they just sit and listen to me for an hour or two at a time. That’s crazy!

On the other, though, I’m still a little terrified whenever I get up to do it. What if my fly is undone? What if I flub a line? What if I fuck up my blocking? What if I’m thinking about all that so I’m too in my head and they can see that OH GOD THE EYES THEY SEE EVERYTHING THEY CAN SEE MY SOUL HEEEEEELP.

Living somewhere between that pure joy of attention, and the cold, shivering terror of same, is why I keep coming back even when the rational part of my brain says “you know what, maybe you should get a real job or something.” It’s like the best high ever.

To catch Isaiah and all the #LRRit gang in action you’re too late.  Don’t miss the next one.  Seriously.

#selfies 2.8 ACTOR EDITION Jacob H. (with questions by Tim E.)

Tim E. got  chance to connect with actor Jacob Horstmeier recently,  and all of Jacob’s deepest secrets are revealed in this week’s episode of SELFIES 2.0.

#selfie 2.0  is an interview series where Lather, Rinse, Repeat playwrights interview the actor ensemble for their next night of short plays.  Playwrights have free reign over the questions. The interviewee must then post an actual selfie, because we told them to.

Tim E: Where were you born and raised? What’d you like to do as a kid?

Jacob H: I was born in Madison, WI and raised in Random Lake, WI, a town of about 1500 people.  I have three siblings, two older brothers and one younger sister, and while growing up our favorite pastime was breaking any and all rules our parents left us with for the day.

Tim E: Nice. And how’d that lead into you get into theater and acting?

Jacob H: I was introduced to acting by our local community theatre’s summer production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. I was a part of the children’s chorus and after finishing that experience I thought maybe this was how I wanted to spend the rest of my life.

Tim E: As you’re a native to Madison, I need to know: Favorite picnic salad: Potato, Macaroni, or other?

Jacob H: At the moment, my gut’s telling me potato salad.

Tim E: How did you get connected to LRR? Thru a particular playwright, or thru actor friends?

Jacob H: I got connected to LRR through the lovely Brandon Marianne Lee.  She wrote a short adaptation of Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus for the school at Primary Stages’ Detention Series, and I was lucky enough to be a part of her very funny script.

Tim E: And finally, If you could invite any 5 people (living or dead) to a party, who would you invite?

Jacob H: My dinner party: Abraham Lincoln, Bill “The Butcher” Cutting, Christy Brown, Nathaniel Poe and Daniel Day-Lewis

To catch Jacob and all the #LRRit gang in action be sure to keep November 2nd free and clear and Buy tickets for Mistakes Were Made: An Evening of Rom-Com and Political Shorts

#selfie 2.7 ACTOR EDITION Heather LR. (with questions by Natalie W.)

Heather Lee Rogers comes to us by way of Flux Theatre Ensemble (where Lauren F. first met her and brought her in!). She was excellent in Jen’s play Iona Means Island, and we’re glad to have her back. You can find out more at http://www.heatherogers.com/.

#selfie 2.0  is an interview series where Lather, Rinse, Repeat playwrights interview the actor ensemble for their next night of short plays.  Playwrights have free reign over the questions. The interviewee must then post an actual selfie, because we told them to.

NATALIE W. What is your earliest memory of a compelling moment of theater, and how did it influence your path to becoming an actress?

HEATHER LR.  I grew up in rural Massachusetts, so I didn’t see a whole lot of theater when I was growing up.  But we had class plays in school.  The first play I was ever in (that had actual blocking, and wasn’t just a line of little kids picking noses adorably) was a play version of The Nutcracker.  I was just a cousin in the first scene and had helped paint the big paper birch trees that represented the forest of the Sugarplum Fairy.  Anyway, after the play was done and people applauded I had my first RUSH.  It felt like there was this whole world of pretend we had created together and I had just felt it palpably slip away.  Total magic. Playing pretend but with a whole cafeteria full of people. That’s when I decided this was what I wanted to do.

NATALIE W.  On your website, you wrote that you want to “speak text and ideas that make rooms gasp”. What is your favorite gasp so far that you’ve provoked?

HEATHER LR.   It’s funny.  I’ve done a lot of theater with beautiful, strong language (and seek that out always), but the real live gasps I’ve experienced have been more about moments of human connection, not so much about the lines.  I think my favorite reaction ever was when I was playing Emilia in Othello for a bunch of 9th graders.  They were a terrible, rowdy audience; it was hell.  But they really connected with our Desdemona.  There is the scene where Othello is calling her a “whore”, and in our production he was just about to smack her, when Emilia interrupts by entering.  So I entered.  There was a real gasp.  And then some kid, not sure if it was a boy or girl, in a deep-dead-serious voice said “GET HIM.”  AND NO ONE LAUGHED.  It taught me that Emilia’s really the only person in that play that CAN save Desdemona, she’s the only one with enough brains and guts, and the tragedy is that in the last scene she just gets there a little too late.  I learned so much about my character from that kid!

NATALIE W.    You also mention you want to play villains and kings. What is your dream not-usually-performed-by-a-woman role and why?

HEATHER LR.   Oh man.  I’m terrible at answering “dream role” questions!!  I want to play Richard III, Claudius in Hamlet, Henry V (in Henry V)… huh. Why is it easier to imagine with classical roles?  Is it the distance or, the precedent of gross-gender casting throughout history?  But when I’ve seen theater that casts adults as kids or women as men or mixes up race roles it can be really profound.  You listen differently to what these characters say and what they’re about when you are forced to get rid of the short-cut conclusions you can make when actors are cast WITHIN type. Theater is kind of about the universality of the human condition, and acting by definition is taking on a character OUTSIDE of yourself… I’m rambling.

NATALIE W. What keeps you sane in this crazy business? (or are you not sane?)

HEATHER LR.  I have two keys to staying sane:  The first is to see as much theater as I can so that I stay inspired and excited about making theater. Then all the masochistic horribleness of this business keeps making sense somehow. The second is to surround myself with supportive, theater-making friends who hustle hard and work all the time. We inspire each other and we believe in each other which is everything.

NATALIE W.  Let’s take a moment to brag about you. Why do you think LRR asked you to be part of our awesome evening of short plays? What sets you apart as an actress?

HEATHER LR.     I think Lauren asked me to be part of this because she’s seen me play around at Flux Sundays (with Flux Theatre Ensemble) where the name of the game is making big, strong, choices and running with them. I’m good at working that way.  ALSO I was so enamored with her play Somewhere Safer, which she partly developed at Flux Sundays, that I approached stalker status… perhaps throwing me a casting bone was her alternative to getting a restraining order.  Yeah, seriously, I do think that’s why I’m here:  When I see work I like and connect with I’m very forward about introducing myself and saying point blank “I would love to work with you.”  There’s this weird conceit among actors that we need to wait around to be invited to the party, nonchalantly hope to be noticed, and be all cool and aloof about it. It’s a strategy I don’t have patience for or understand. Psyched to work with all of you!

To catch Heather, Natalie and all the #LRRit gang in action be sure to keep November 2nd free and clear and Buy tickets for Mistakes Were Made: An Evening of Rom-Com and Political Shorts